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Editorial Reviews. Review. "Sites of Slavery is a meticulously researched, persuasively argued, Look inside this book. Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post–Civil Rights Imagination by . Valerie Smith, author of Toni Morrison: Writing the Moral Imagination. "Sites of Slavery is an original.
Table of contents

Salamishah Tillet

Reconstructing Dixie. Tara McPherson. Sitting in Darkness. Peter Schmidt. Territories of the Soul. Nadia Ellis. Race Consciousness. Judith Jackson Fossett. The Routledge History of the American South. Maggi M.

New America

The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window. Lorraine Hansberry.

Salamishah Tillet

Black Venus Deborah Willis. Awakening to Race. Jack Turner. Facing Blackness. Ashley Clark. Child Slavery before and after Emancipation. Anna Mae Duane. Louisa S Nye. Early African American Print Culture. Lara Langer Cohen. The Black Arts Movement. James Smethurst. Bernard W.

Magnolias without Moonlight. Sheldon Hackney. Cosmopolitan Fictions.

Sites of Slavery

Katherine Stanton. Half Sisters of History. Catherine Clinton. The Time is Always Now. Nick Bromell. The Black Cultural Front. Brian Dolinar. Society and Culture in the Slave South. William Harris. The Hero And the Blues. Albert Murray. Reaping Something New. Daniel Hack. Untimely Democracy. Gregory Laski. Dreaming Out Loud.

Horace Porter. Chaotic Justice. John Ernest. John Chua. Our Living Manhood. Rolland Murray. Sites of Southern Memory. Darlene O'Dell. Remembering Generations. The Contemporary African American Novel. Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, Maggie McKinley. Picture Freedom. Jasmine Nichole Cobb.

Darryl Dickson-Carr. Conjuring Freedom. Johari Jabir. Postracial America? Vincent L. Toni Morrison's Black Liberal Humanism and other excerpts. William A. The Haverford Discussions. How does our framing of Reconstruction shape our engagement with different audiences, whether through museums, the courtroom, social media, or the classroom? Or are we best off drawing attention to specific events, laws, and individuals instead of Reconstruction in general?

As Martin Luther King Jr. Why do so many people not have an understanding of Reconstruction? Perhaps because our educational systems, the public landscape, and the media have been influenced by differing ideas of freedom—what it should mean, who can claim it, and how it should be exercised. One of the most effective presentations for our Memphis Massacre commemoration project was a lecture by Dr. Andre E.

Salamishah Tillet - Wikipedia

Johnson linking the current Black Lives Matter movement to the testimonies before the military and congressional investigating committees. That one question includes and leads to so many others that link that past and our present. How did the Union lose Reconstruction—and what were the results of that loss, that failure, that incomplete commitment, that grant of rights followed by decades of denying the duty to provide enforcement and protection?

What do centuries of slavery—and the foundational narrative of racial difference and black inferiority—do to a country and its people?

When slavery ends, what is required to reset the path toward black rights and citizenship rather than the same exploitative and dehumanizing goals and justifications? Which did we do and which future did we build? We see the violent repression of black voting rights in Memphis ; New Orleans ; Colfax, Louisiana ; Vicksburg, Mississippi ; and elsewhere.

Congress in We see him become the first black person to speak on the House floor when he opposed a plan to grant amnesty to Confederate leaders and predicted that, if the U.